Posted tagged ‘sports psychology’

Like An Iditarod Sled Dog – flat out

March 7, 2014

Winners have learned to go full speed ahead all the time. No matter if it’s in practice or the real thing, they take it on with a full head of steam. They never have to give a second effort because they only play with continuous effort. Winners don’t have a middle gear. They don’t know what half speed is all about. Like an Iditarod sled dog, winners only know one speed – flat out.

Advertisements

Come through like a seasoned veteran

February 18, 2014

People who mentally prepare for competition rarely fail when it’s time to shine. When things heat up, winners stay cool and focused. The days preceding a big event, picture yourself performing with ease in every pressure situation you could face. Create the entire scene in your mind. Picture the very atmosphere. Take the time and energy to visualize and you’ll come through like a seasoned veteran on game day.

The natural athlete that lies within us all

July 27, 2013

Everybody starts out as a natural athlete in childhood, but very few continue to be one as they grow up. Somewhere along the way most lose the gift. A child’s approach to play is natural — free of self-concept, free of emotional barriers and fears. Approach sports as you did when you were a child, and you will rediscover the natural athlete that lies within us all.

Champions Are Developed In The Off-season

June 28, 2013

Champions are developed in the off-season. All the hours of practice, all the hard work, and all the sacrifices – these things will not be forgotten. When the season rolls around and crunch time nears, champions will take what they deserve. They know how much was invested and they understand that they are the most prepared. They paid their dues – they refuse to lose.

Parenting The Reset Generation

September 18, 2012

Parents today hate to see their kids lose. As soon as it gets a bit tough, parents hit the reset button for their kids.
High school coaches, instructors and teachers often remark on how kids today lack “stick-toit-ness” They hop to another sport or activity when it gets a little too challenging, never testing their potential…nurtured to reset it.

More from the fall-out of The Reset Generation

July 20, 2012

Message flagged

Monday, June 4, 2012 8:42 AM

High school coaches often remark that more kids today lack “stick-to-itiveness.” As soon as it gets a little tough, many teens are out and on to the next activity, eventually sticking with nothing. Sticktoitiveness is a very important life skill…one that all teenagers need to learn. There’s more to schooling than academics.

By the time kids become teens they either have commitment skills or they don’t. Sticktoitiveness development begins in childhood, those impressionable years — where kids are easily influenced and often conditioned. The environment kids grow up in today is nothing like the past. Look around. Watch for the ways we condition our kids to give up.

Here’s my top five reasons why kids don’t develop”sticktoitiveness” today.

1. Parents giving in when kids first give up Kids need time to develop competence. No fun without competence. Don’t make quitting easy. Once you give in, they know you are their way out.

2. Too many structured activities at parent’s finger tips It’s good to expose kids to many activities but jumping from one to another can send a negative message — no sense of commitment. They do something for a short time and move on.

3. Too “kid friendly” Sometimes our society can be a little over-sensitive and this ends up removing the challenge for kids. No sense of accomplishment when things are made easy.

4. “Over-trophying” If kids get trophies for just showing up, how does this encourage them to practice? The manifestation of instant gratification begins with parents

5. The reset button. I call it the no-regret button. Giving up is a click away.

High school coaches often remark that more kids today lack “stick-to-itiveness.” As soon as it gets a little tough, many teens are out and on to the next activity, eventually sticking with nothing. Sticktoitiveness is a very important life skill…one that all teenagers need to learn. There’s more to schooling than academics.

By the time kids become teens they either have commitment skills or they don’t. Sticktoitiveness development begins in childhood, those impressionable years — where kids are easily influenced and often conditioned. The environment kids grow up in today is nothing like the past. Look around. Watch for the ways we condition our kids to give up.

Here’s my top five reasons why kids don’t develop”sticktoitiveness” today.

1. Parents giving in when kids first give up Kids need time to develop competence. No fun without competence. Don’t make quitting easy. Once you give in, they know you are their way out.

2. Too many structured activities at parent’s finger tips It’s good to expose kids to many activities but jumping from one to another can send a negative message — no sense of commitment. They do something for a short time and move on.

3. Too “kid friendly” Sometimes our society can be a little over-sensitive and this ends up removing the challenge for kids. No sense of accomplishment when things are made easy.

4. “Over-trophying” If kids get trophies for just showing up, how does this encourage them to practice? The manifestation of instant gratification begins with parents

5. The reset button. I call it the no-regret button. Giving up is a click away.

Enter the zone

January 5, 2012

Reaching the “zone” is the pinnacle of sports. Once experience, it’s what every athlete strives for the rest of his playing days. Playing “in the zone” is the ultimate lure of sports. It is a special time when your mind quiets and your senses take over. It’s when everything you can do in practice flows out in a game like it was second nature. Stay focused on the “now” long enough and everything will become easy and effortless — everything will begin to click. Suddenly, it will feel as if you were switched to automatic pilot — you’ll have entered the “zone.”


%d bloggers like this: